1. 00:13 12th Oct 2014

    Notes: 27782

    Reblogged from harukami

    greencarnations:

    voidbat:

    merlinsbane:

    this would be a good time to donate to xkit-extension because they’re doing a lot of hard work and they’re just one dude so yknow. toss some cash their way if you can so we can go back to blogging properly.

    seriously, chrome broke fucking EVERYTHING in xkit and dude put it first priority before a paying gig and 100% burnt himself out getting it back to moderate functionality. if you use xkit and have money to donate, definitely do. the work he puts in is worth it.

    also buy the app; it’s better than the tumblr app and gives money to the xkit guy

    seriously buy the app. I’m reblogging this from the app right now. it’s excellent and also tons more functional than the official tumblr app. definitely worth it.

     
  2. 20:07 11th Oct 2014

    Notes: 82084

    Reblogged from micromys

    samkinsman:

    sixpenceee:

    Who remembers the Berenstain Bears? Many people actually remember it as the Berenstein Bears. It’s part of the Mandela theory, or a term that someone is positive something happened although it didn’t. Many attribute these false memories as a glimpse into a parallel universe. (Source)

    I AM WORRIED ABOUT THIS

    … or it could just be simple interference. “-stein” is a very common ending to surnames, whereas “stain” is practically unique. Same reason why it’s super easy to misremember a phone number containing the sequence “2435” as “2345” instead—the latter is so much more common in the environment than the former that it feels more “right” when you’re trying to retrieve from your memory, even if in the specific case it’s actually wrong.

     
  3. 22:58 6th Sep 2014

    Notes: 18593

    Reblogged from harukami

    ladeh-amanda:

    Reblog if you’re part of the feminist illuminati here to take games away from pissbabies.

     
  4. 17:17 17th Aug 2014

    Notes: 86866

    Reblogged from emileesaurus

    ok but I was expecting this to be another FMA thing and now I feel like my wires are crossed

    ok but I was expecting this to be another FMA thing and now I feel like my wires are crossed

     
  5. image: Download

    thanks plurk, that’s real helpful of you

    thanks plurk, that’s real helpful of you

     
  6. tickatocka:

    a kitten trying super hard to fight a ceramic cat statue

     
  7. 20:07 25th Jul 2014

    Notes: 1

    sometimes I think plurk goes down just to remind us all of how dependent we are on plurk

     
  8. 18:16 21st Jul 2014

    Notes: 60100

    Reblogged from roachpatrol

    image: Download

    roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

trufax, this effect is actually strong enough that you’ll see it even when experimental participants are just presented with an image of a door between test phases.

    roachpatrol:

    jetgreguar:

    allrightcallmefred:

    fredscience:

    The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

    I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

    Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

    The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

    Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

    I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

    this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

    FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

    trufax, this effect is actually strong enough that you’ll see it even when experimental participants are just presented with an image of a door between test phases.

     
  9. 10:09 16th Jul 2014

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from inklesspen

    inklesspen:

    Okay so HOLY SHIT I have been WASTING MY LIFE. For twenty-seven years I’ve been uselessly bumbling to and fro, fro and to, merely FILLING IN TIME until I ate a pork bun.

    This article assumes you haven’t eaten a pork bun yet – that you are as I once was, indeed as I was this very morning, unaware of what pork buns were like – so if you HAVE eaten a pork bun, you can stop reading. Go eat a pork bun. Live your life.

    Let me tell you about pork buns.

    This is for blame-my-muses and anyone else who appreciates a good pork bun.

    … I am deeply mystified at the kind of life a person must have lead such that balled-up white bread is the closest comparison they can think to make for a pork bun

     
  10. image: Download

    dtysen:

At some point in his magnificent, all-encompassing career, Leonardo Da Vinci drew a whole page of cats.

    dtysen:

    At some point in his magnificent, all-encompassing career, Leonardo Da Vinci drew a whole page of cats.

    (Source: dtysen-etc)